HARM / INDIANA ANTIFA SUPPORT

Hoosier Anti-Racist Movement / Antifa Info and discussion

Learn more at http://vengeanceforbrandon.wordpress.com/

Please sign the petition at: http://t.co/wsuG0Rfhj0

In the early hours of Feb 17, three people pursued the car of Jessie Stout. They forced her to pull her car over and violently assaulted her. The biracial passenger of the car, Brandon Pettiford, was the real target of the assault. Racial slurs were hurled at Brandon while he was nearly kicked to death. According to the attackers’ own words they pursued him because he had flirted and danced with a white girl at a house party earlier that evening. The three accused attackers are being held on a small bond and one minor felony despite Brandon’s critical condition. Local authorities claim their hands are tied, largely because of the lack of state legislation against hate crimes. We’re petitioning the White House to direct the Department of Justice to investigate the incident.

Angela Davis - The Prison Industrial Complex (17 parts all MP3 files)

dildosandglitter:

superheru7:

Angela Davis - The Prison Industrial Complex (17 parts all MP3 files)
01 - On Becoming An Activist.mp3 
02 - Race, Class & Incarceration.mp3 
03 - Young Black Men & Prison.mp3 
04 - Technologies Of Punishment.mp3 
05 - The Specter Of Crime.mp3 
06 - Political Persecution.mp3 
07 - Enemies Are Needed.mp3 
08 - Targeting Women.mp3 
09 - Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric.mp3 
10 - Nike.mp3 
11 - The War On Drugs.mp3 
12 - Corporations & Patterns Of Immigration.mp3 
13 - The Prison Industrial Complex.mp3 
14 - Making A Difference.mp3 
15 - Who Pays, Who Plays.mp3 
16 - What Is To Be Done.mp3 
17 - Breaking The Silence.mp3

ACCESS TO THIS KNOWLEDGE IS FUCKING IMPORTANT.

take advantage of this and listen….now.

(via whoisdangerwoman)

anarcho-queer:

Private For-Profit Prison Company Used In Drug Raids At Public High Schools
In Arizona an unsettling trend appears to be underway: the use of private prison employees in law enforcement operations.
Recent events in the central Arizona town of Casa Grande show the hand of private corrections corporations reaching into the classroom, assisting local law enforcement agencies in drug raids at public schools.


At 9 a.m. on the morning of October 31, 2012, students at Vista Grande High School in Casa Grande were settling in to their daily routine when something unusual occurred.
Vista Grande High School Principal Tim Hamilton ordered the school — with a student population of 1,776 — on “lock down,” kicking off the first “drug sweep” in the school’s four-year history. According to Hamilton, “lock down” is a state in which, “everybody is locked in the room they are in, and nobody leaves — nobody leaves the school, nobody comes into the school.”

”Everybody is locked in, and then they bring the dogs in, and they are teamed with an administrator and go in and out of classrooms. They go to a classroom and they have the kids come out and line up against a wall. The dog goes in and they close the door behind, and then the dog does its thing, and if it gets a hit, it sits on a bag and won’t move.”
While such “drug sweeps” have become a routine matter in many of the nation’s schools, along with the use of metal detectors and zero-tolerance policies, one feature of this raid was unusual. According to Casa Grande Police Department (CGPD) Public Information Officer Thomas Anderson, four “law enforcement agencies” took part in the operation: CGPD (which served as the lead agency and operation coordinator), the Arizona Department of Public Safety, the Gila River Indian Community Police Department, and Corrections Corporation of America (CCA).
It is the involvement of CCA — the nation’s largest private, for-profit prison corporation — that causes this high school “drug sweep” to stand out as unusual; CCA is not, despite CGPD’s evident opinion to the contrary, a law enforcement agency.
“To invite for-profit prison guards to conduct law enforcement actions in a high school is perhaps the most direct expression of the ‘schools-to-prison pipeline’ I’ve ever seen,” said Caroline Isaacs, program director of the Tucson office of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), a Quaker social justice organization that advocates for criminal justice reform.
“All the research shows that CCA doesn’t properly train its staff to do the jobs they actually have. They most certainly do not have anywhere near the training and experience—to say nothing of the legal authority—to conduct a drug raid on a high school,” Isaacs added. “It is chilling to think that any school official would be willing to put vulnerable students at risk this way.”
CCA, the nation’s largest for-profit prison/immigrant detention center operator, with more than 92,000 prison and immigrant detention “beds” in 20 states and the District of Columbia, reported $1.7 billion in gross revenue last year. This revenue is derived almost exclusively from tax payer-funded government (county, state, federal) contracts through which the corporation is paid per-diem, per-prisoner rates for the warehousing of prisoners and immigrant detainees.

anarcho-queer:

Private For-Profit Prison Company Used In Drug Raids At Public High Schools

In Arizona an unsettling trend appears to be underway: the use of private prison employees in law enforcement operations.

Recent events in the central Arizona town of Casa Grande show the hand of private corrections corporations reaching into the classroom, assisting local law enforcement agencies in drug raids at public schools.



At 9 a.m. on the morning of October 31, 2012, students at Vista Grande High School in Casa Grande were settling in to their daily routine when something unusual occurred.

Vista Grande High School Principal Tim Hamilton ordered the school — with a student population of 1,776 — on “lock down,” kicking off the first “drug sweep” in the school’s four-year history. According to Hamilton, “lock down” is a state in which, “everybody is locked in the room they are in, and nobody leaves — nobody leaves the school, nobody comes into the school.”


”Everybody is locked in, and then they bring the dogs in, and they are teamed with an administrator and go in and out of classrooms. They go to a classroom and they have the kids come out and line up against a wall. The dog goes in and they close the door behind, and then the dog does its thing, and if it gets a hit, it sits on a bag and won’t move.

While such “drug sweeps” have become a routine matter in many of the nation’s schools, along with the use of metal detectors and zero-tolerance policies, one feature of this raid was unusual. According to Casa Grande Police Department (CGPD) Public Information Officer Thomas Anderson, four “law enforcement agencies” took part in the operation: CGPD (which served as the lead agency and operation coordinator), the Arizona Department of Public Safety, the Gila River Indian Community Police Department, and Corrections Corporation of America (CCA).

It is the involvement of CCA — the nation’s largest private, for-profit prison corporation — that causes this high school “drug sweep” to stand out as unusual; CCA is not, despite CGPD’s evident opinion to the contrary, a law enforcement agency.

To invite for-profit prison guards to conduct law enforcement actions in a high school is perhaps the most direct expression of the ‘schools-to-prison pipeline’ I’ve ever seen,” said Caroline Isaacs, program director of the Tucson office of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), a Quaker social justice organization that advocates for criminal justice reform.

All the research shows that CCA doesn’t properly train its staff to do the jobs they actually have. They most certainly do not have anywhere near the training and experience—to say nothing of the legal authority—to conduct a drug raid on a high school,” Isaacs added. “It is chilling to think that any school official would be willing to put vulnerable students at risk this way.

CCA, the nation’s largest for-profit prison/immigrant detention center operator, with more than 92,000 prison and immigrant detention “beds” in 20 states and the District of Columbia, reported $1.7 billion in gross revenue last year. This revenue is derived almost exclusively from tax payer-funded government (county, state, federal) contracts through which the corporation is paid per-diem, per-prisoner rates for the warehousing of prisoners and immigrant detainees.

(via aunty-fascist-deactivated201305)